Guest Top 10 2013 – Henrik (GrantDN) Nr.7

Gunpoint

That poor guard...
That poor guard…

Real-life industrial espionage is boring, don’t you think? I certainly wish it was more along the lines of how Gunpoint displays it, involving hacking security systems, jumping really high/far through windows because of your sweet shoes, and punching guards potentially infinitely, despite only needing 1 hit to knock them out.

Gunpoint is the creation of one Tom Francis, former PC Gamer UK writer, who after having critiqued games for a huge chunk of his life, decided to make one and show them how it’s done. His first attempt, while feeling very conservative, is an A-class effort to behold, with Gunpoint being an incredibly enjoyable little stealth-platformer, with some witty banter written by Mr. Francis to help keep the atmosphere light and very breezy.

You play as Richard Conway, a man who considers himself a ‘’freelance spy’’, who after just having received his sweet mail-order shoes, manages to get himself involved with an intricate corporate plot from which he now has to find a way to clear himself of, putting his trade and his gadgetry to use.

Mistakes were made.
Mistakes were made.

Gunpoint is an example of a game with very simple goals and ideals, a short length and a very concise path proving to be an absolute boon to it. I heartily recommend everyone play Gunpoint, because clocking in at a little over an hour, it’s a short-but-incredibly-sweet experience to behold.

Top 10 Runner-up: Monaco

Accurate portrayal of a multiplayer Monaco match
Accurate portrayal of a multiplayer Monaco match

Every good heist needs its fair share of quirky specialists depending on what’s needed, and Monaco manages to create some fantastic archetypes with which to pull off professional-level heists or create absolute chaos in Monaco, whether playing single-player, or multi-player (which is definitely more of the draw for this game). These include the Mole, who is OBSESSED with digging, the Hacker who only ever speaks in abbreviations and leetspeak, and the Cleaner, a mute professional who can knock out guards if he can sneak up behind them.

Monaco is a simple top-down perspective puzzle-platformer, where the goal of the game is either to finish specific objectives, clear all the coins or whatever else the game decides needs to be done, and then after that the players (at least 1 of them) must reach the finish aswell, or it will all have been for naught.

While Monaco can be pretty enjoyable if played with a serious stealth-game thought-process, the greatest joy comes from heists going terribly wrong in that game, when you’ve got guards screaming at you in french, dogs chasing you, alarms tripping constantly, and coins to catch in order to boost your score, Monaco’s manic nature is certainly where you will find the most fun.

The Boat, The Boat, The Boat is on fire!
The Boat, The Boat, The Boat is on fire!

If you were to get Monaco, I would suggest finding at least 1 friend or mutual partner who you could play it with, and if possible, try and get the max of 4 players in a game. As a single-player experience, Monaco feels a bit less enjoyable, but it seems a very intentional decision to focus on the multiplayer aspect as such, and I’d very much recommend it if you can muster up some other players.